Sample Workout Programs

Fit to Ski and Snowboard
Now that all of the components of a snowriding conditioning program have been discussed in detail, it is time to put your own program together.  The sample workouts provided here can help.  Each workout has three parts:  flexibility, endurance, and strength.  Although the flexibility portion appears first, remember that most gains occur when stretching is performed at the end of a workout.  Each flexibility routine includes lying, kneeling, sitting, and standing stretches.  Be sure to select a few from each group with each program you design.  The Sun Salutation (Yoga) is not included with the samples.  Instead, use the Sun Salutation (Yoga) as a wake0-up or warm-up routine as often as possible.  It will increase your flexibility and energize you first thing in the morning.

Each endurance program blends indoor and outdoor exercises.  Depending on weather conditions, you may be forced to use more indoor endurance exercises – but, if possible, create a blend.  Labels of “low,””moderate,” and “high” are given to describe the intensity level of an exercise.  “Low” refers to 60-70 percent of maximum heart rate and 6 to 7 on the RPE scale.  “High” refers to 80 to 90 percent of maximum heart rate and 7 to 9 on the RPE scale.

The strength programs combine upper body, lower body, and torso exercises as well as plyometric exercises.  Several exercises incorporate stability balls, medicine balls, and balance boards.  If you have access to this type of equipment, incorporate them into your routine as often as possible.  If not, create as much variety in the other exercises as possible.  Emphasize the exercises that are challenging.  Too often people focus on the exercises that are heir “strong suits,” performing these exercises more than any others, which creates strength imbalances (one muscle stronger than its counterpart).  Imbalances lead to improper movement, and improper movements increase the chance of injury.  Part of this approach is to find the exercises that are challenging.  The true challenge is not to bench press 300 pounds, rather, it is to find the weaker muscles and improve their strength.

Not all exercises appearing in this book are included in the sample routines.  I didn’t want you to simply copy my routines.  Be original!  Be creative!  Use the variety and information provided here to create your own workout program.  Refer as often as you like to the photos and descriptions of the various exercises.  The flexibility exercises are in Chapter 2; endurance exercises in Chapter 4; strength exercises in Chapter 5; and plyometric exercises in Chapter 6.  See Appendix 1 for a list of all exercises, and refer to the index to locate the page number for a specific exercise by name.

Home Program

Gyms and health clubs aren’t your cup of tea?  Too many muscleheads?  Too much fluorescent spandex?  Whatever the issue, don’t worry – you don’t have to join the sweatshops.  The following sample routines can be performed outside a gym in the comfort and privacy of your home.  Do consider investing in a few dumbbells, a medicine ball, a stability ball, and perhaps a balance board.  These accessories will increase the number of exercises available to you.

Gym Program

Are you a member of a gym or thinking of joining one in the near future?  The following routines are samples of what your gym routine might look like.  Some machines may differ from the ones featured in this book.  If you are unfamiliar with the equipment, be certain to ask a gym staff member for help.

One more thing:  remember gym etiquette.  Please carry a workout towel to wipe your perspiration off machines, ad be sure to allow other gym members to share equipment you are using when you are between sets.  Your fellow gym members will thank you.