Fit to Surf


The Surfer’s Guide to Strength and Conditioning by Rocky Snyder

Rocky Snyder FIt to SurfCopyright© 2003 by Rocky Snyder.  All rights reserved.
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Advanced Balance Training

The following exercises are devoted to balance and coordination.  These are two key components of surfing that traditional strength and endurance training programs do not necessarily include.  The average ride on a wave lasts less than 30 seconds.  That is not a lot of time to develop balance skills.  If you are a beginning surfer, your ride will last only a few seconds.  If you are a seasoned surfer, your surfing is limited to when there are waves.  Wouldn't it be nice to be able to spend more time developing balance and coordination?  This is where the Indo Board can make a big difference.  This tool is basically an oval piece of thick plywood and a large plastic cylinder.  The object is to stand and balance on the board as it teeters on the cylinder.  The more time spent developing balance and coordination on the Indo Board (or a similar board), the better your surfing.

These exercises can be performed on a daily basis through the week without interfering with your other training.  As you ability, balance, and coordination on the board improves, traditional strength training exercises can be incorporated. (e.g. lateral raise, straight-arm pull-down, triceps pushdown).  Ultimately, any exercise that can be performed in a standing posture can be done on the indo Board.

The sample workouts in the appendix do not include Indo Board training to two reasons: the advanced nature of the exercises and because not everyone owns one.

These are very advanced exercises and should be executed with extreme caution.  Before attempting any of them it would be wise to become familiar with the movements of the Indo Board by simply standing on it while trying to maintain your balance.  Beginners should have a sturdy post to hold on to due to the potential hazards of the exercises.