Cool Relationships

            The joints of the body have cool relationships with each other. When you study the skeletal structure, you can see many interesting similarities. There are roughly the same number of bones in the hands, feet, and spine. The skull protects the brain, similar to the rib cage protecting the heart and lungs, and the pelvis protecting the digestive and reproductive organs.

            The legs and arms both have one long bone connected to two bones. This makes sense when you consider that over 2.5 million years ago we were walking around on all fours. That was when the wrist was an ankle. The elbow was a knee. The shoulder used to be a hip joint. Since we became bipedal (walking on two legs) the arms have different purposes, but the primitive relationships still remain housed in our nervous system.

            Now when we walk, one arm moves in concert with the opposite leg. Not just on a musculoskeletal level but on a neurological level. This means that stimulating the nerves of one joint may have a beneficial effect on its structural counterpart. For instance, if you have pain in your left elbow, making circles with your right knee may help reduce the discomfort. Just stand on your left leg and bring your right leg up in front of you. With your foot dangling under the knee, begin to make 6 perfect circles with the lower leg. Reverse directions and make 6 more perfect circles. Now check in with your left elbow. Feel different?

            If you have a cranky wrist on your right side, try performing ankle circles on your left leg. Just balance on your right leg and make small circles in both directions with your left foot off the floor. Check your wrist again and see if it feels different. If your left shoulder is giving you a bit of trouble, try doing hip circles with your right leg. Give it a try and see if the shoulder feels better. This is just a quick way to hack into your system. It may seem like magic, but sometimes all the body needs is a little movement in a seemingly unrelated area to make things feel a little better. You can follow the chart below to perform your own little hack into your system.

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